展开全部

题目列表

题目内容
Early scholars described square dances as a type of ancient English country dance carried to the southern Appalachian Mountains and preserved unchanged for generations. However, while the Appalachian fiddle repertoire does include traditional reels that can be traced back to the British Isles, it also includes breakdowns, rags, and other musical features native to America. Appalachian songs similarly range from British ballads to African American blues. Given this musical diversity-not to mention the iconic presence of the banjo, an instrument with African roots-it would be naive to think the accompanying dances are purely English forms. While sections of Appalachia are relatively isolated, trade, travel, and immigration have continually introduced new cultural elements, including innovations in social dances, into the region`s rural traditions.
Based on the passage, it can be inferred that Appalachian square dancing
The author mentions "social dances " primarily to
In his 1836 landscape The Oxbow, Thomas Cole provided viewers with a grand portrayal of' American wilderness on the canvas's left, which he sharply juxtaposed with a scene of modern human "improvement" of the land on the right. Scholars have been struck by the very distinctive markings on the distant mountain in The Oxbow. It has been argued that these marks can be read as Hebrew letters: when looking directly at the mountain, the Hebrew equivalent for "Noah" is seen, and if viewed from above (by God), the markings spell "Shaddai" or "the Almighty". There are a number of reasons to question such a literal interpretation of the markings: the underdrawings for both the oil study and the finished canvas show no sign of lettering on the mountain, and Hebrew scholars who have carefully examined the markings do not accept this reading.

Moreover, by the 1830s, the Oxbow region of the Connecticut River valley was plagued by rapid clearing of forests including on the sides of mountains. In her watercolor of the site at this time, View of Mount Holyoke, Massachusetts, and the Connecticut River, artist Eliza Goodridge indicated selective clear-cut areas on the mountain Cole had become increasingly alarmed by this development, and he began to depict the effects of clear-cutting in his landscapes in the ears leading up to The Oxbow, as seen in his 1833 View of Hoosac Mountain and Pontoosuc Lake near Pittsfield, Massachusetts, in which areas of deforestation are visible on the distant mountain. Similar clear-cut sections appear on the mountain in his on-site drawing for The Oxbow, highlighting the importance of this transformation of the natural environment.

Yet that Cole might decide, as he was finishing the painting, to draw attention to this area of deforestation by including markings that roughly form a pattern or an inscription, not to be read literally is in keeping with the artist's practice of embedding his compositions with symbols and moral messages. In addition, deforestation had been on his mind for some time as a sign of man's destructive alteration of nature for financial "utilitarian" gain. A possible inspiration for these markings are the works of John Martin as seen in his painting Belshazzar 's Feast, which includes Hebraic letters Cole's constant references to mountains as pyramidal forms, and the fact that he had painted an ancient pyramid that was inscribed with Latin lettering, suggest that Cole may have intended the viewer to read the pattern on the mountain as a biblical reference that alerted them to God' s judgment of humans' recent destruction of his pure creation. The mountain is defaced, just as all other areas of the landscape at right have been altered, by the hand of man.
The passage is primarily concerned with
The author mentions the findings of the "Hebrew scholars" mainly to
The author suggests that Cole's inclusion of "distinctive markings" on the mountain in The Oxbow
Consider each of the choices separately and select all that apply.

The author mentions which of the following as evidence of how Cole intended the markings on his painting to be read?
Most of the studies of the effect of aging on short-term memory have led researchers to conclude that younger adults perform short-term-memory tasks better than people over the age of 65. But these studies were all conducted in afternoon sessions. In a recent study conducted both in morning and in afternoon sessions. the older participants performed much better in morning sessions than in afternoon sessions. The younger participants did not, however, perform any better in the morning.
The statements given are structured to lead to which of the following conclusions
This passage is adopted from material published in 2005

Given that ants and aphids are both abundant insect groups that often share the same habitats, that aphids excrete energy-rich honeydew, and that ants aggressively defend resources, it is difficult to understand why so few species of aphid have evolved a close relationship with ants. For example, only a quarter of the aphid species in the Rocky Mountain region are attended by ants, and in Central Europe, about one third are obligate myrmecophile [animals that closely associate with ants]. More than a dozen hypotheses have been proposed to account for the variability in aphid-ant relationships and the low proportion of attended species. First among them is the plant permissive hypothesis, which suggests that host-plant quality plays a critical role in determining the attractiveness of aphids for ants. Both variation in the quality of different hosts or different parts of the same host plant may affect the quality of honeydew, which is either more or less attractive to ants. However, this hypothesis ignores the fact that several species of aphids may feed on the same host plant or even plant organ but have very different degrees of associations with ants and assumes that the quality of phloem sap determines that of the honeydew. Recent studies have found that feeding on woody plant parts is positively associated with ant attendance, whereas mobility, feeding in isolation, and having winged adults are negatively associated with ant attendance.
Which of this following, if true, would best support the plant permissive hypothesis?
Which of the following best describes the function of the highlighted sentence in the context of the passage as a whole?
Based on the passage, which of the following can be most plausibly inferred about "recent studies"?
Early scholars described square dances as a type of ancient English country dance carried to the southern Appalachian Mountains and preserved unchanged for or generations. However, while the Appalachian fiddle repertoire does include traditional reels that can be traced back to the British Isles. it also includes breakdowns, rags, and other musical features native to America. Appalachian songs similarly range from British ballads to African American blues. Given this musical diversity-not to mention the iconic presence of the banjo, an instrument with African roots-it would be naive to think the accompanying dances are purely English forms. While sections of Appalachia are relatively isolated, trade, travel, and immigration have continually introduced new cultural elements, including innovations in social dances, into the regions rural traditions.
The passage suggests that which of the following was true of "early scholars?
According to the passage, Appalachian square dancing differs from English country dancing in that Appalachian square dancing
In his 1836 landscape The Oxbow, Thomas Cole provided viewers with a grand portrayal of' American wilderness on the canvas's left, which he sharply juxtaposed with a scene of modern human "improvement" of the land on the right. Scholars have been struck by the very distinctive markings on the distant mountain in The Oxbow. It has been argued that these marks can be read as Hebrew letters: when looking directly at the mountain, the Hebrew equivalent for "Noah" is seen, and if viewed from above (by God), the markings spell "Shaddai" or "the Almighty". There are a number of reasons to question such a literal interpretation of the markings: the underdrawings for both the oil study and the finished canvas show no sign of lettering on the mountain, and Hebrew scholars who have carefully examined the markings do not accept this reading.

Moreover, by the 1830s, the Oxbow region of the Connecticut River valley was plagued by rapid clearing of forests including on the sides of mountains, In her watercolor of the site at this time, View of Mount Holyoke, Massachusetts, and the Connecticut River, artist Eliza Goodridge indicated selective clear-cut areas on the mountain Cole had become increasingly alarmed by this development, and he began to depict the effects of clear-cutting in his landscapes in the ears leading up to The Oxbow, as seen in his 1833 View of Hoosac Mountain and Pontoosuc Lake near Pittsfield, Massachusetts, in which areas of deforestation are visible on the distant mountain. Similar clear-cut sections appear on the mountain in his on-site drawing for The Oxbow, highlighting the importance of this transformation of the natural environment.

Yet that Cole might decide. as he was finishing the painting. to draw attention to this area of deforestation by including markings that roughly form a pattern or an inscription, not to be read literally is in keeping with the artist's practice of embedding his compositions with symbols and moral messages. In addition, deforestation had been on his mind for some time as a sign of man's destructive alteration of nature for financial "utilitarian" gain. A possible inspiration for these markings are the works of John Martin as seen in his painting Belshazzar 's Feast, which includes Hebraic letters Cole's constant references to mountains as pyramidal forms, and the fact that he had painted an ancient pyramid that was inscribed with Latin lettering, suggest that Cole may have intended the viewer to read the pattern on the mountain as a biblical reference that alerted them to God' s judgment of humans' recent destruction of his pure creation. The mountain is defaced, just as all other areas of the landscape at right have been altered, by the hand of man.
It can be inferred that the author of the passage would agree with which of the following statements about the "grand portrayal of American wilderness" in Cole's The Oxbow?
In the context in which it appears, "indicated " most nearly means

共收录:

25000 +道题目

151本备考书籍

最新提问